cd(1)									cd(1)



NAME
  cd - Changes the current working directory

SYNOPSIS

  cd [directory]

DESCRIPTION

  The cd command moves you from your present directory to another directory.
  You must have execute (search) permission in the specified directory.

  If you do not specify a directory, cd moves you to your login directory
  ($HOME in ksh and sh environments, or $home in csh environment).  If the
  specified directory name is a full pathname, it becomes the current working
  directory.  A full pathname begins with a / (slash) for the root directory,
  with a .  (dot) for the current working directory, or with a ..  (dot dot)
  for the parent directory.  If the directory name is not a full pathname, cd
  searches for it relative to one of the paths specified by the $CDPATH shell
  variable (or $cdpath csh variable).  This variable has the same syntax as,
  and similar semantics to, the $PATH shell variable (or $path csh variable).

EXAMPLES

   1.  To change to your home directory, enter:
	    cd


   2.  To change to a new directory, enter:
	    cd	/usr/include

       This changes the current working directory to /usr/include.  Now file
       pathnames that do not begin with / or ../ specify files located in
       /usr/include.

   3.  To go down one level of the directory tree, enter:
	    cd	sys

       If the current working directory is /usr/include and if it contains a
       subdirectory named sys, then /usr/include/sys becomes the current
       working directory.

   4.  To go up one level of the directory tree, enter:
	    cd	..

       The special filename .. (dot dot) always refers to the directory
       immediately above the current working directory.

RELATED INFORMATION

  Commands:  csh(1), ksh(1), pwd(1), sh(1).


  Functions:  chdir(2).